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  • 30 years and counting!

    Some thirty years ago I wandered my way out to the local strip where I had a hangar full of training aircraft, to get my first glimpse at the “new” Stearman on the field. I found it; it was sitting on the grass right in front of my big silver hangar and even from a distance I could see that there was something odd about it.

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  • We visit the Swift Museum Foundation

    They departed from the rag and tube design and tooled the aircraft in all aluminum. This was a radical departure from competing aircraft of the time. With its tail dragger stance, riveted stressed skin, and retractable main gear the Swift became a pilots dream come true, and in May of 1946 the first Globe Swift, GC-1A, was type certificated.

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  • Winter Blues

    Between the dark and the cold it’s about as depressing as it can get. Still I persist. Every year vowing “never again.” It’s much like the old hangover prayer, “Lord, I will never do it again.” But the next year winter arrives and I am still here renewing my vows while I shiver.

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  • Winter Ops

    Well, there was that stint in the Middle East where I actually wished I could see some nasty cold weather, but that hardly compares to the decades I have spent in the deep freeze waiting for that rat Punxsutawney Phil to decide if winter will end or hang on to add to my misery. What the hell does he know anyway? He’s in Pennsylvania. That’s the “banana belt” in the winter compared to Michigan.

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  • The Onex project continues . . .

    If you build one of these little rockets be prepared to shave things down to 64th’s. Plans were no doubt generated on a computer, and computers find it pretty easy to measure down to the 64th of an inch. Alas, builders do not. If the airplane were built to tight tolerances I could see the point. However measuring the length of the wing flap down to 64th’s of an inch when there is a half inch gap left between flap end and fuselage, seems a bit over zealous.