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  • Mr. Howard’s Neighborhood

    The nose gear is always properly placed at the rear of the airplane and the view from the cockpit therefore requires “S” turn in order to see ahead. Taildragger pilots all seem to have longer than usual necks I have noticed; probably the result of craning the see over the combing during those “S” turns.

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  • Onex Project / “Wings and Things”

    Plans call for the combing to be placed over the tank and top edge of the instrument panel and riveted in place. It would seem prudent to me to put nut plates in this location rather than rivets since I am virtually positive that sooner or later someone, somewhere, is going to need to get to either the fuel tank or the back of the instrument panel for something.

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  • 30 years and counting!

    Some thirty years ago I wandered my way out to the local strip where I had a hangar full of training aircraft, to get my first glimpse at the “new” Stearman on the field. I found it; it was sitting on the grass right in front of my big silver hangar and even from a distance I could see that there was something odd about it.

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  • We visit the Swift Museum Foundation

    They departed from the rag and tube design and tooled the aircraft in all aluminum. This was a radical departure from competing aircraft of the time. With its tail dragger stance, riveted stressed skin, and retractable main gear the Swift became a pilots dream come true, and in May of 1946 the first Globe Swift, GC-1A, was type certificated.

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  • Winter Blues

    Between the dark and the cold it’s about as depressing as it can get. Still I persist. Every year vowing “never again.” It’s much like the old hangover prayer, “Lord, I will never do it again.” But the next year winter arrives and I am still here renewing my vows while I shiver.